BadRabbit Ransomware

A new variant of the Petya ransomware has been discovered, known as BadRabbit.

The ransomware’s dropper is delivered by a drive-by attack when a user is visiting a legitimate compromised website. The dropper is a fake Adobe Flash Player installer which, when clicked, will execute BadRabbit.

Once the malware completes the file encryption the ransom note is displayed on the user’s device.

Indicators of Compromise

Initial infection vectors

  • fontanka[.]ru
  •  interfax[.]ru

Compromised intermediate site

  • hxxp://1dnscontrol[dot]com/flash_install.php

Hashes

  • install_flash_player.exe: 630325cac09ac3fab908f903e3b00d0dadd5fdaa0875ed8496fcbb97a558d0da
  •  infpub.dat: 579fd8a0385482fb4c789561a30b09f25671e86422f40ef5cca2036b28f99648
  •  cscc.dat (dcrypt.sys): 0b2f863f4119dc88a22cc97c0a136c88a0127cb026751303b045f7322a8972f6
  •  dispci.exe: 8ebc97e05c8e1073bda2efb6f4d00ad7e789260afa2c276f0c72740b838a0a93

MD5 hashes

  •  fbbdc39af1139aebba4da004475e8839
  •  b14d8faf7f0cbcfad051cefe5f39645f (dropped file)

Target File Extensions
.3ds.7z.accdb.ai.asm.asp.aspx.avhd.back.bak.bmp.brw.c.cab.cc.cer.cfg.conf.cpp.crt.cs.ctl.cxx.dbf.der.dib.disk.djvu.doc.docx.dwg.eml.fdb.gz.h.hdd.hpp.hxx.iso.java.jfif.jpe.jpeg.jpg.js.kdbx.key.mail.mdb.msg.nrg.odc.odf.odg.odi.odm.odp.ods.odt.ora.ost.ova.ovf.p12.p7b.p7c.pdf.pem.pfx.php.pmf.png.ppt.pptx.ps1.pst.pvi.py.pyc.pyw.qcow.qcow2.rar.rb.rtf.scm.sln.sql.tar.tib.tif.tiff.vb.vbox.vbs.vcb.vdi.vfd.vhd.vhdx.vmc.vmdk.vmsd.vmtm.vmx.vsdx.vsv.work.xls.xlsx.xml.xvd.zip.

Affected Platforms

Microsoft Windows – all versions

Remediation

If a computer on your network becomes infected with ransomware it will begin encrypting local machine files and files on any network the logged-in user has permission to access. For system administration accounts this may include backup storage locations.

To avoid becoming infected with ransomware, ensure that:

  • A robust program of education and awareness training is delivered to users to ensure they don’t open attachments or follow links within unsolicited emails.
  • All operating systems, antivirus and other security products are kept up to date.
  • All day to day computer activities such as email and internet are performed using non-administrative accounts and that permissions are always assigned on the basis of least privilege.
  • Your organisation adopts a holistic all round approach to Cyber Security as advocated by the 10 Steps To Cyber Security.

Identifying the source of infection:

Identifying the infected machine and unplugging / disconnecting or quarantining it from the network is essential to damage limitation.

  • Users should immediately report infections to their IT support provider, disconnect their network cable and power the computer down.
  • File auditing should be enabled and file server logs should be monitored to detect signs of unauthorised encryption and allow the source of encryption to be identified (i.e. the infected PC).

To limit the damage of ransomware and enable recovery:

All critical data must be backed up, and these backups must be sufficiently protected/kept out of reach of ransomware.

  • Multiple backups should be created including at least one off-network backup (e.g. to tape).
  • The only guaranteed way to recover from a ransomware infection is to restore all affected files from their most recent backup

 




Duncan Newell

Duncan is a technology professional with over 20 years experience of working in various IT roles. He also has a wide range of other skills in radio, electronics and telecommunications.

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